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The Igigi were a group of gods in the Sumerian mythology. According to the myth, the Gods were younger and they were the Anunnaki



service, at least until they rebelled, forcing their owners to create humans.

The term Semite “Igigi” or “Igigu” refers to a group of deities of Mesopotamia. As the meaning of “Anunna” remains difficult and controversial interpretation, so the word “Igigi” needs further study to be understood. Moreover, it is not entirely clear what distinguishes Anunna by Igigi. As reported by the page of Oracc (The Open Richly Annotated Corpus Cuneiform), the term appears in the myth of Atrahasis hero in the Babylonian version of the Epic of Gilgamesh, according to the story of the Great Flood.

The text dates from the seventeenth century BC and is engraved on a board kept at the British Museum in London. The finding provides some evidence on the relationship between the Anunnaki and the Igigi. The text consists of three tables, each of which develops for eight columns, four on the front and four on the back, each column consists of about 55 lines. The whole work therefore consists of a total of 1,245 lines, only some of which have come down to us.

The Poem of Atrahasis opens with the arrival condition to be created after the cosmogony: the god of heaven, Anu, has ascended to heaven; Ea (Enki), fell nell’Apsû, the underworld of the abyssal water, upon which rests the earth; Enlil took for himself the earth, with all living things it contains. The Igigi gods was instead imposed the work on the land, an area where reigns god Enlil. The Igigi dig rivers, including the Tigris and Euphrates, and the channels. The heavy lifting of the Igigi gods, done during the day and at night, lasts for 2500 years. So, starting from line 39 of Table I of the poem, these gods begin to brood, until one of them encourages them to abandon their jobs and to rebel. The Igigi hearken to their partner and thrown into the fire the work tools, and marching together, are directed towards the shrine of Enlil.

 

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