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Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found. Our ancestors, millions of years before Lucy, the forerunner of ancestral men who lived in Africa 3.2 million years ago, crossed an evolutionary phase on which nothing was known yet.

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

A safety for scientists who only a few years ago discovered the oldest fossil skeleton of an ancestor of man. The skeleton – attributed to a species called Ardipithecus ramidus – belonged to a female with a small brain weighing 50 kilograms, which was nicknamed “Ardi”. This fossil has disproved the hypothesis, in vogue since the days of Darwin, that there was a missing ring – placed midway between man and monkeys of our day – that would be at the root of the tree of the human family. Indeed, these fossil testimonies suggest that studying anatomy and the behavior of chimpanzees, long considered by the scholars as the monkey from which to derive the nature of the first hominids, is in fact of little relevance in understanding our origins. Ardi, on the other hand, shows a combination of advanced features and primitive traits found in monkeys far ahead of chimpanzees or gorillas. As such, it is a skeleton that opens a window about the possible characteristics of the common ancestor between men and today’s monkeys. It’s a far more important finding than Lucy’s. It shows that the last common ancestor between men and chimpanzees did not look like a chimpanzee or a man or any middle ground. The fossils of Ardipithecus ramidus were found in the hospitable desert of Afar, Ethiopia(Then the Lord God planted a garden in Eden to the east and placed the man he had molded. A river came out of Eden to water the garden, then split up and formed four courses. The second river is called Ghicon: it flows around the entire Ethiopian region).

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

In a place called Aramis, located in the central part of the Awash region, only 74 kilometers from where it was found in 1974 that the species of Lucy, Australopithecus afarensis. 

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

The radiometric dating of the two layers of volcanic ash that seal the fossil deposits from the top and the bottom revealed that Ardi lived 4.4 million years ago. Other fossils of hominids found in the past, including a skull in Chad at least 6 million years ago, are important, but no one reveals as many elements as the remains in this newly discovered deposit, where apart from the partial skeleton of Ardi bones counted by another 36 individuals. From day to day we found ourselves with a skeleton with fingers, toes, arms, legs, head, and teeth. This allows us to do things that can not be done with isolated finds. It allows us to search in the organic area. The most striking aspect of Ardipithecus’s biology is the odd way he has to move. All the hominids are known so far – all members of our ancestral lineage – walked on two legs, just like us.

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

Ardi’s basin, feet, legs, and hands suggest instead to move like a bipedal on the ground and like a quadruped on the trees. The big toe, for example, separates from the foot like that of a monkey to better grasp the branches of the trees. Unlike the chimpanzee’s foot, however, Ardipithecus has a small bone with a tendon, handed down by more primitive ancestors, which maintains the stiffer divergent jaw. Combined with the changes to the other toes, this bone, so shaped, would help Ardi walk like a biphosphate on the ground, though less efficiently than later hominids such as Lucy. This particular bone has also been lost in ancestral families of chimpanzees and gorillas. According to the researchers, the basin has a mosaic of very similar characteristics. The large jagged bones of the top were positioned so that Ardi could walk on two legs without sliding with the body from side to side as the chimpanzees do. The lower one, however, had the structure of a monkey to leave plenty of room for the powerful back muscles to move the trees. Even on Ardi trees did not move like a modern monkey, the researchers reported. Current chimpanzees and gorillas have the anatomy of the evolved arts to a specialization that allows them to climb vertically along tree trunks, to hang and swing between the branches and to walk leaning on the ground with knuckles. However, these behaviors require bones and joints of the rigid and very strong wrists, while Ardipithecus’s wrists and fingers are remarkably flexible. It has been argued that Ardi probably walked on his palms when he moved on trees, similar to other primitive fossil monkeys and chimpanzees and gorillas. What Ardi is telling us is that in our evolution there was an intermediate phase of which we did not know anything. This discovery changes everything! The first and fragmented finds of Ardipithecus were discovered at Aramis in 1992, while the work was published in 1994. The newly discovered skeleton was also found in 1992 and brought to light along with the bones of other individuals in the next three seasons excavation. However, given that the bones were in poor condition, it took 15 years before the research team could analyze it in depth and then publish the results. After the death of Ardi, his remains, allegedly, were trampled and pushed into the mud by hippos or other herbivores. Millions of years later, erosion brought these bones deformed and deformed on the surface, but they were so fragile that it would suffice to make them dust. In order to preserve these precious fragments, archaeologists took the fossils together with the stone that contained them. The rest of the work was then carried out in a laboratory in Addis Ababa where the researchers, using a needle guided under a microscope and proceeding “from millimeter to sub-millimeter”, were able to detach the bones from the rock matrix. Years. Skull fragments were then subjected to TAC and digitally reconstructed.

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

At the end of this process, the research team found 125 parts of a skeleton, including bones of the feet, and almost complete hands – a real rarity among hominids fossils of any period, not to mention even more ancients. Finding this skeleton was more than a fortune, it was a miracle. On the same site, the team also found fossils of about 6,000 animals and other finds that allow rebuilding the world inhabited by Ardi: a woody and humid region, very different from the arid landscape today. In addition to species of antelopes and forests associated with monkeys, the deposit contained forest birds, figs, and palms. (Typically from Garden of Eden).Garden Eden, was planted by Lord God. Where is it?

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

Consumption and isotopes of the ointment’s teeth suggest a diet based on fruit, nuts and other foods found in the forests. If White and his team are right that Ardi was walking on the ground, but he also climbed the trees, and this brings together the conclusions that the environmental finds bring, this discovery would be the death bells for “the Savannah hypothesis” The old known theory that our ancestors acquired the upright position as a function of the need to move in a tall grass environment. Some researchers, however, are not entirely convinced that Ardipithecus has been so versatile. It is undoubtedly a fascinating skeleton, but based on what has been presented so far, bipedal trials are at least limited. Divergent joints are associated with the function of the grip and this skeleton has the most divergent beams you can imagine. So why does an animal fully adapted to support the weight on the front limbs of the trees should choose to walk on the ground like a biped? A provocative answer to this question – originally from Lovejoy in the early eighties and now proposed in the light of the discovery of Ardipithecus – attributes the origin of bipedality to another characteristic trait of man: sex monogamous. Almost all monkeys, and especially males, have very long, long-standing canines: formidable weapons in struggles to gain the right to mating. According to the researchers, Ardipithecus was probably already initiated along a single-human evolutionary path, since he had “feminized” canines, that is, very small dimensions – a diamond-shaped monkey. Lovejoy considers these changes part of an epochal change in social behavior: instead of struggling to gain the right to pair with a female, Ardipithecus used as a strategy to harvest food and pass it to a chosen female and her offspring to earn her Sexual loyalty. To behave this way, to bring the food to the female, the male had to have his hands free. Bipedalism for Ardipithecus could initially be a simple way to move while becoming functional to the strategy of “sex in return for food” was also an excellent way to have a larger offspring. And of course, in evolution, a larger offspring Is the goal in play. Approximately 200,000 years after Ardipithecus, another species called Australopithecus anamnesis appeared in the region. Research generally agrees that this species is soon evolved to become Australopithecus afarensis, already equipped with a slightly larger brain and leading a completely bipedal life. Finally came the Homo genus, with his brain even bigger and an ever-increasing ability in the use of instruments. Can it be said that the primitive Ardipithecus, in the 200,000 years that separate it from the Australopithecus, has undergone changes that made it the ancestor of all subsequent hominids? Or did the Ardipithecus extinct and with it all the bizarre primitive and advanced characteristics of this species?

Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.

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Eve skeleton, the oldest skeleton ever found.